Jennifer L. Marines

Jennifer L. Marines

Partner

New York, (212) 336-4491

Education

Williams College (B.A., 2002)
Brooklyn Law School (J.D., 2005)

Bar Admissions

New York

Jennifer Marines is partner in the Business Restructuring & Insolvency Group and deputy chair of the firm’s finance department. Ms. Marines has experience representing chapter 11 debtors, creditors, investors, and other parties in interest in all aspects of complex corporate restructurings, including chapter 11 cases, out-of-court restructurings, and distressed acquisitions.

Her practice includes advising senior management and boards of directors of financially troubled companies with respect to restructuring and business operations in chapter 11; advising official committees of creditors with respect to restructuring strategies; negotiating and structuring financings and other commercial transactions; and advising clients seeking to purchase businesses and related assets out of chapter 11 proceedings.

Ms. Marines is a member of the New York City Bar’s Bankruptcy & Corporate Reorganization Committee, a member of the International Insolvency Institute’s NextGen Leadership Program, a board member of the Women in Law Empowerment Forum, and a member of the Turnaround Management Association NextGen Committee.

In 2015, Ms. Marines was recognized by Legal 500 US in the area of corporate restructuring. She has been named a Bankruptcy Rising Star for 2016 by Law360, as well as an Outstanding Young Restructuring Lawyer for 2016 and 2017 by Turnarounds & Workouts.

Ms. Marines served as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert D. Drain, United States Bankruptcy Judge for the Southern District of New York. She earned her J.D. cum laude from Brooklyn Law School.

In re Sungevity, Inc.
(Bankr. Del.) Counsel to Sungevity, Inc. and its affiliates in their chapter 11 cases. Sungevity is one of the largest private residential solar installation companies in the United States. Sungevity filed with approximately $185 million in prepetition debt, including funded debt, trade debt and potential employee related claims.
In re Maxus Energy Corporation, et al.
(Bankr. D. Del.). Counsel to Maxus Energy Corporation and four affiliated debtors in their chapter 11 cases. Maxus and its affiliated debtors are engaged primarily in the business of managing various oil and gas-related interests, as well as providing environmental remediation management services. The companies have significant environmental remediation obligations and litigation liabilities.
In re Peabody Energy, Inc., et al.
(Bankr. E.D. Mo.) Counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors of Peabody Energy, the world’s largest privately owned coal producer, and 153 of its subsidiaries, which collectively held $10.1 billion in prepetition debt.
In re SunEdison, Inc., et al.
(Bankr. S.D.N.Y.) Special counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors in the chapter 11 cases of SunEdison, the world’s largest renewable energy developer.
In re Walter Energy Inc., et al.
(Bankr. N.D. Ala.) Counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors of Walter Energy, Inc. and its affiliates. Walter, a major producer of metallurgical coal, struggled as a result of the precipitous fall in the price of metallurgical coal in recent years and eventually was forced to seek bankruptcy protection in July 2015 in an effort to restructure its more than $3.1 billion in debt.
In re HOVENSA LLC
(Bankr. D.V.I.) Counsel to HOVENSA LLC, once owner of one of the ten largest oil refineries in the world, in its chapter 11 case. At the time of its bankruptcy filing, HOVENSA had approximately $2 billion of prepetition indebtedness, exclusive of significant legacy liabilities primarily in the form of environmental obligations, pension obligations, and retiree benefits.
In re Patriot Coal Corporation, et al.
(Bankr. E.D. Va.) Counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors in the chapter 11 cases of Patriot Coal Corporation, a leading producer and marketer of metallurgical and thermal coal in the eastern U.S. with approximately 2,900 active employees at the time of filing, approximately $791 million in prepetition funded debt, and significant legacy liabilities (primarily in the form of retiree benefits, pension obligations, and environmental obligations).
In re Energy Future Holdings Corp., et al.
(Bankr. D. Del.) Counsel to the official committee of TCEH unsecured creditors in the chapter 11 cases of Texas power company Energy Future Holdings Corp. and its affiliates, which filed for bankruptcy in April 2014. This is the 10th largest bankruptcy in U.S. history with the debtors holding approximately $40 billion in debt.
In re Residential Capital, LLC, et al.
(Bankr. S.D.N.Y.) Acted as counsel to Residential Capital and its affiliates, comprising one of the largest residential real estate finance companies at the time of its chapter 11 filing, with assets and liabilities each in excess of $15 billion. The debtors’ business was comprised primarily of loan servicing and origination. Residential Capital was the largest bankruptcy filing of 2012 and the case represents the first time ever that a mortgage servicer was able to successfully continue servicing and originating mortgages in bankruptcy and be sold as a going concern.
In re Sungevity, Inc.
(Bankr. Del.) Counsel to Sungevity, Inc. and its affiliates in their chapter 11 cases. Sungevity is one of the largest private residential solar installation companies in the United States. Sungevity filed with approximately $185 million in prepetition debt, including funded debt, trade debt and potential employee related claims.
In re Maxus Energy Corporation, et al.
(Bankr. D. Del.). Counsel to Maxus Energy Corporation and four affiliated debtors in their chapter 11 cases. Maxus and its affiliated debtors are engaged primarily in the business of managing various oil and gas-related interests, as well as providing environmental remediation management services. The companies have significant environmental remediation obligations and litigation liabilities.
In re Peabody Energy, Inc., et al.
(Bankr. E.D. Mo.) Counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors of Peabody Energy, the world’s largest privately owned coal producer, and 153 of its subsidiaries, which collectively held $10.1 billion in prepetition debt.
In re SunEdison, Inc., et al.
(Bankr. S.D.N.Y.) Special counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors in the chapter 11 cases of SunEdison, the world’s largest renewable energy developer.
In re Walter Energy Inc., et al.
(Bankr. N.D. Ala.) Counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors of Walter Energy, Inc. and its affiliates. Walter, a major producer of metallurgical coal, struggled as a result of the precipitous fall in the price of metallurgical coal in recent years and eventually was forced to seek bankruptcy protection in July 2015 in an effort to restructure its more than $3.1 billion in debt.
In re HOVENSA LLC
(Bankr. D.V.I.) Counsel to HOVENSA LLC, once owner of one of the ten largest oil refineries in the world, in its chapter 11 case. At the time of its bankruptcy filing, HOVENSA had approximately $2 billion of prepetition indebtedness, exclusive of significant legacy liabilities primarily in the form of environmental obligations, pension obligations, and retiree benefits.
In re Patriot Coal Corporation, et al.
(Bankr. E.D. Va.) Counsel to the official committee of unsecured creditors in the chapter 11 cases of Patriot Coal Corporation, a leading producer and marketer of metallurgical and thermal coal in the eastern U.S. with approximately 2,900 active employees at the time of filing, approximately $791 million in prepetition funded debt, and significant legacy liabilities (primarily in the form of retiree benefits, pension obligations, and environmental obligations).
In re Energy Future Holdings Corp., et al.
(Bankr. D. Del.) Counsel to the official committee of TCEH unsecured creditors in the chapter 11 cases of Texas power company Energy Future Holdings Corp. and its affiliates, which filed for bankruptcy in April 2014. This is the 10th largest bankruptcy in U.S. history with the debtors holding approximately $40 billion in debt.
In re Residential Capital, LLC, et al.
(Bankr. S.D.N.Y.) Acted as counsel to Residential Capital and its affiliates, comprising one of the largest residential real estate finance companies at the time of its chapter 11 filing, with assets and liabilities each in excess of $15 billion. The debtors’ business was comprised primarily of loan servicing and origination. Residential Capital was the largest bankruptcy filing of 2012 and the case represents the first time ever that a mortgage servicer was able to successfully continue servicing and originating mortgages in bankruptcy and be sold as a going concern.

In 2015, Ms. Marines was recognized by Legal 500 US in the area of corporate restructuring. She has been named a Bankruptcy Rising Star for 2016 by Law360, as well as an Outstanding Young Restructuring Lawyer for 2016 and 2017 by Turnarounds & Workouts.

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