Speaking Engagement

Privacy and Antitrust: Data’s Mom and Dad Just Got Engaged

IAPP Brussels 2022

17 Nov 2022 12:15 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.

SQUARE – Brussels Convention Centre
Mont des Arts/Kunstberg
Brussels, Belgium B-1000

Though privacy laws and concerns have been around for decades now, they have an older sibling: Antitrust. The regulatory framework governing market concentrations has recently shifted its attention to an area that overlaps with privacy: data. In this session we will explore and explain how these two regulatory regimes are converging and at times clashing. What relevancy for the privacy domain follows from the recent German Facebook antitrust case? What does the draft EU Digital Markets Act mean for a company’s collection and handling of personal information? How do global tech giants navigate and use each set of laws to their advantage? What antitrust fundamentals should every privacy professional know, and which conversations will you want and need to have with your antitrust colleagues? This session will be critical for everyone working in a data-driven environment.

What you will learn: 

  • The fundamental principles of antitrust law as relevant to the privacy profession. 
  • Recent regulatory antitrust developments relevant to the personal information domain. 
  • Which questions to ask and which conversations to initiate with antitrust colleagues in your organisation.

Panelists

  • Monika Tomczak-Gorlikowska, CIPP/E, CIPT, CPO, Prosus Group
  • Alex van der Wolk, Global Co-Chair Privacy, Data Security, Partner, Morrison Foerster


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