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Music Piracy and Diminishing Revenues: How Compulsory Licensing for Interactive Webcasters Can Lead the Recording Industry Back to Prominence

University of Pennsylvania Law Review

June 2018
Reprinted with permission and copyrighted by the University of Pennsylvania Law Review.

Morrison & Foerster associate Neil S. Tyler suggests that Congress should amend the Copyright Act to ensure that promising new music-based technologies are able to survive amidst music privacy concerns in his comment for the University of Pennsylvania Law Review titled “Music Piracy and Diminishing Revenues: How Compulsory Licensing for Interactive Webcasters Can Lead the Recording Industry Back to Prominence.”

Neil S. Tyler, Music Piracy and Diminishing Revenues: How Compulsory Licensing for Interactive Webcasters Can Lead the Recording Industry Back to Prominence, 161 U. PA. L. REV. 2101 (2013)

 

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